Announcement: Free Poetry Workshop with Chen Chen (Sponsored by Poetry@Tech)

We are reposting this announcement we just received from Travis Denton, the Associate Director of Poetry@Tech and editor of Terminus Magazine, regarding a poetry workshop being offered by award-winning poet Chen Chen. It sounds like an amazing opportunity, and it just so happens to be free and open to the public.


Hi Everyone—

Registration is now open for a FREE virtual generative poetry workshop with CHEN CHEN on Saturday, October 2, 2021 from 2-5pm from Poetry@Tech. We’re excited to offer this unique opportunity to spend an afternoon writing with CHEN CHEN. Thanks to the generous support of the Poetry Foundation for making this event possible.

Here’s more about the workshop:

REPETITION, VARIATION, MIGRATION:

In this generative workshop we’ll discuss how contemporary immigrant and refugee poets use various kinds of repetition and variation to articulate their lived experiences. Between talking about model poems by Tarfia Faizullah, Li-Young Lee, Aracelis Girmay, and others, we’ll try to use repetition and variation in our own ways. We’ll play and fail and try again. We’ll leap.

For more information about the workshop or to register via our quick online registration form, click on

https://poetry.gatech.edu/events/fall-2021-workshop-chen-chen.

The workshop is free, and open to the public. Register soon, as space may be limited. If you have any questions or just want to be in touch, I’d love to hear from you. See you in workshop on October 2.

Only Good Things Always,

Travis Denton

Poetry@Tech

Editor, Terminus Magazine


 

Submit to RAMBLE Magazine!

You might not think of yourself as a creative person, but we are all creative in different ways. Here at RAMBLE we offer a chance for our creative Georgia Tech students from around the globe to submit and publish their poems, their memoirs, their photos, and all sorts of other creative artifacts. If you meet our eligibility criteria for submitting (see below), then this might be the publishing opportunity that you have been waiting for!

A submissions post with a pink background and black border with a silhouette of a black city skyline.

RAMBLE seeks to publish original, unpublished creative work (poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and much more) produced by multilingual and international undergraduate and graduate students at Georgia Tech who meet one or more of the following eligibility criteria:

    • you are learning English as a second or other language
    • your first language is a postcolonial variety of English (as an example, if you come from Singapore and spoke a variety of Singapore-English growing up)
    • you come from a bilingual/multilingual home situation

If you believe you meet our criteria for eligibility, but are not certain, just email us and we can let you know. If you would like to submit to RAMBLE, please feel free to submit work for review by sending it to Kendra Slayton at GTworldenglishescommittee@gmail.com.

Before submitting, please read our Submissions and FAQ pages for more information on what we are looking to publish. We also invite you to read an issue of the magazine so you can get a sense of the kinds of pieces we publish. We are not a paying market, but we are always excited to review and potentially publish new and interesting work by our students.

What I Did with My Summer Vacation, and Why I’m Not Embarrassed

It’s a new semester, and the World Englishes Committee is back in full swing. We are excited to get back to our usual business with projects and events and more!

A shot from Luis Buñuel’s 1930 French film L’Age d’Or (“The Golden Age“).

To kick off this academic year, I wanted to share one of the ways I spent my summer. Since I was not blogging for this site, I must have been doing something else that was productive, right? Well, for some people, watching a lot of international films may not exactly be perceived as productive, but for me, stuck at home much of the time, folding a lot of laundry during the evening and so on, it made my summer pass in ways that were enlightening and satisfying in ways that writing articles (I did that too, all right?) is not. Over and over, I was finding cinematic treasures that presented beautiful cinematography and compelling story-telling that made me laugh, cry, and wonder and ultimately left me in awe and admiration. [Note: By the way, one of the goals I made at the beginning of summer was to not watch a single movie in English, and I did pretty well as the only English-speaking films I ended up watching were The French Connection (1971) and Sharknado (2013).]

So, here is what I am going to do: I am going to share an alphabetical list of international films I have watched since the Spring 2021 Semester ended. I will link to reviews and articles about each one, but I won’t offer any commentary of my own since the list is quite long. Not every film left the same enduring impression on me, but taken overall the experience of spending my summer watching these films was memorable and valuable. I feel that I was indeed very productive.

To cap this post off, I would like to add that BBC Culture conducted a project in which they asked 209 critics from 43 countries about what they considered the greatest examples of international cinema. As a result, BBC Culture eventually generated a top-100 list, which I am using and will continue to use to guide my own forays into international film-watching. I would encourage you to do the same. Enjoy!

~Jeff Howard


Work Cited

“L’Age d’Or.” IMDb, n.d. https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1187043/. Image.